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Election Post Mortum – At Risk Population of Immigrants

??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????I think I went to bed around 10:30 PM on election night.  Pretty early for sure.  But once the analysis was coming in on voting trends in Florida and Michigan, I knew the writing was on the wall.

So what does a Trump presidency mean in the world of immigration?  Potentially a lot.  I am very fortunate to have a diverse law practice, and within our immigration practice, we serve both corporate clients (e.g., from start-ups to mature businesses) and individuals and families.  A fair amount of the individuals that we serve are what I consider to be at-risk; some are here in the United States lawfully, and others not.  Many do not want to go home.  These are amazing people, with amazing and often horrifying stories to tell of why they came to the United States, and how.  Unfortunately, because of what we’re seeing in the aftermath of the election, many of them are now scared, really scared (including some of our corporate clients)!

On the one hand, we have business clients who are concerned about their foreign national employees, whether they’re going to be able to remain here, whether their working status will be able to be extended, whether they can safely take business trips outside the United States and return unimpeded.  All sorts of questions.  I try to assure these folks that nothing, yet anyway, has changed, as far as their employees are concerned.

And then we have what I refer to as our at risk clients, some here lawfully and some not, many who came to the United States leaving terrible and dangerous situations back in their home countries, and who are legitimately fearful to return.  Many of these individuals are unaccompanied minors, kids who have been abandoned by their families back home and who made perilous journeys across our Southern border, seeking a better life.  I am very concerned about this population.

This is the time when scammers, and so-called notarios, are likely to come out of the woodwork.  We’re advising clients not to fall for scammers or notarios who will prey on this at risk population, people who are often confused and are no doubt fearful about the election results.

We’re receiving daily calls from clients and potential clients who are afraid of what the next four years may mean to them and their families, their businesses, and their communities.  Our job now, more than ever, is to work with them, help them realize the American dream, and help them overcome any obstacles that may be created by our new President and our immigration laws and regulations.

When we receive these calls, our first response is “don’t panic”!  With perhaps one or two exceptions, we do not know for sure exactly what will happen when President-elect Trump takes office in January.  We’re advising our clients not to make any hasty or rash decisions, and instead take the time necessary to review their particular situation, get the facts, review the law, and know their rights.

One of the things that the President-elect said he would do on “Day 1” is rescind many of the executive actions put into place under the Obama Administration.  The biggest one, in the immigration arena, is no doubt President Obama’s 2012 initiative known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (“DACA”).  That program allows some aliens who are unlawfully present in the United States, and who had been brought to the United States as children and met other criteria, to also receive deferred action and, in many cases, employment authorization.

As of June 30, 2016, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) had approved close to 750,000 DACA applications (since 2012).  We do not know if, how or when DACA might end.  President-elect Trump could take action on DACA immediately or soon after his inauguration, weeks or months later, or perhaps not at all if he softens or changes his position (as he has so often done of late).

Finally, one of the biggest things that we are highly recommending to our clients is, if they are eligible, to apply for citizenship in the United States.  Of course, everyone’s situation is not the same, but if someone meets the basic eligibility requirements for becoming a U.S. citizen, and they have no adverse factors in their background that would make them ineligible for citizenship (or worse, potentially removable from the United States), we’re advising them to take a hard look at applying for U.S. citizenship.  Citizens of the United States have so many more protected under the law than someone who is not.

These are interesting times we live in.  And its only just begun.


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ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTOR

David W. Meyers, Esq. is managing partner of Meyers & Meyers, LLP. David works with individuals, businesses and higher education institutions helping them resolve any issues regarding immigration, citizenship and naturalization for themselves or their employees.

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